Novella completed! Yay me!

I finally completed my short story. I hope the publisher loves it as much as i do. I have included a snippet from the story. It’s a paranormal Romance and very steamy. Hope you like it – feel free to comment!
xoxo Siren
*****

With a growl Devin picked her up and tossed her over his shoulder. Surprised was not a strong enough word to describe how Alyssa felt. She held on to his shirt as he strode to her front door and unlocked it. Devin had to bend down to avoid hitting Alyssa’s head on the top of the door as they entered her home. Devin kicked the door closed behind him not bothering to lock it.
“Where’s the bedroom?” He asked her.

When Comma’s Attack!!!!,,,

Hi all, today’s tip comes from my Daily Writing Tip emails that i receive from dailywritingtips.com. If you haven’t signed up to receive their tips you are truly missing out on some helpful information.

Today’s tip is in regards to comma usage. If you are like me, the more comma’s the better. However, our comma usage may not always be grammatically correct. Read the info below to see if you are using comma’s illegally, 🙂

5 Cases of Excessive Commas

Posted: 25 Feb 2013 08:24 PM PST

The rules about commas can seem so complicated — and contradictory — that writers can (almost) be forgiven for tossing in an extra one or two. Here are several examples of overly generous deployment of commas.

1. “If a killer asteroid was, indeed, incoming, a spacecraft could, in theory, be launched to nudge the asteroid out of Earth’s way, changing its speed and the point of intersection.”
This thirty-word sentence is littered with six commas — one for every five words — five of them appearing before the halfway point. By simply bending the rule about bracketing interjections with commas — a rule that advocates of open punctuation flout routinely anyway — the number is reduced by two, rendering the sentence more free flowing: “If a killer asteroid was indeed incoming, a spacecraft could, in theory, be launched to nudge the asteroid out of Earth’s way, changing its speed and the point of intersection.”

One more comma can be eliminated by relocating the parenthetical phrase “in theory” to an earlier position in the sentence, so that the comma after incoming does double duty: “If a killer asteroid was indeed incoming, in theory, a spacecraft could be launched to nudge the asteroid out of Earth’s way, changing its speed and the point of intersection.”

2. “The metaphor, ‘The world is a machine,’ began to replace the metaphor, ‘The world is a living organism.’”
In this sentence, the comma preceding each instance of metaphor implies that that metaphor is the only one — not just in the sentence, but anywhere. (But two metaphors are expressed here, and innumerable others exist.) Metaphor, appearing in apposition to the two brief quotations, should not be set off from them: “The metaphor ‘The world is a machine’ began to replace the metaphor ‘The world is a living organism.’”

3. “The event is part of a catchy, public health message about the importance of emergency preparedness.”
Catchy and “public health” are not coordinate adjectives. The point is not that the message is catchy and public health; it’s that the public health message is catchy. Therefore, no comma is necessary: “The event is part of a catchy public health message about the importance of emergency preparedness.”

If, by contrast, the sentence read, for example, “The event is part of a catchy, quirky message about the importance of emergency preparedness,” note that because catchy and quirky are parallel — they are coordinate adjectives — a comma should separate them.

4. “The report was completed in December, 2012.”
A comma is necessary between a month and a year only if a date is specified (“The report was completed on December 1, 2012”): “The report was completed in December 2012.” (The same rule applies when the name of a season appears in place of the name of a month: “The report was completed in fall 2012.”)

5. “Jones traveled by boxcar from California to New York with fellow fledgling artist, John Smith, sketching the American landscape along the way.”
Commas are necessary with this type of apposition only if the epithet is preceded by an article (“Jones traveled by boxcar from California to New York with a fellow fledgling artist, John Smith, sketching the American landscape along the way”): “Jones traveled by boxcar from California to New York with fellow fledgling artist John Smith sketching the American landscape along the way.” Unfortunately, this type of error has gone viral — its ubiquity is mistaken for propriety — and is seemingly ineradicable.

*****Very informative. Hope this helped someone. Happy writing!
xoxo Siren

Writing tip – Contests: To enter or not to enter!?!?!

I recently entered a writing contest and lost. 😦 I came in sixth place out of about nine people. Yeah it sucked to lose, but it was and is a learning experience. I received feedback from the judges; their critique’s were very helpful. Todays writing tip is: Enter writing contest and challenges. It helps you grow as a writer. You learn what you’re doing right and what you’re doing wrong. You may not win them all but even when you lose you gain experience as a writer. No great writer became that way the moment they put pencil to paper or hand to keyboard. They had to learn the craft and write, write, and write some more.

Hope this helps someone,
xoxo Siren

Grammar – How I Hate Thee – Let Me Count The Ways!

Hello fellow writers. Today I’m giving you another writing tip from the Daily Writing website. Stop by there and read some of their tips, very informative. You can sign up on their website to receive free writing tips via email. Today’s tips is about compound words and when you should and should not use them.

5 Compound-Word Corrections

Posted: 20 Feb 2013 06:51 PM PST

Writers sometimes confuse a two-word phrase for a closed compound noun consisting of those two words, or vice versa. Here are five cases in which a noun phrase or a verb phrase was mistaken for a compound word or the other way around.

1. “Eating McDonald’s food everyday for four weeks turned this filmmaker into a bloated, depressed wreck.”
Everyday is an adjective (“It’s not an everyday occurrence”). “Every day” is a phrase consisting of an adjective and a noun (“That’s not something you see every day”). In this sentence, the usage is adjective-plus-noun: “Eating McDonald’s food every day for four weeks turned this filmmaker into a bloated, depressed wreck.”

2. “Seen as both godsend and a major let down, it remains the city’s artistic center.”
“Let down,” consisting of a verb and an adverb, is employed in such sentences as “He was let down.” As a closed compound, it’s a noun: “That’s a real letdown.” In this sentence, it should be in noun form: “Seen as both godsend and a major letdown, it remains the city’s artistic center.”

3. “Resistance from the state legislature could doom the governor-elect’s promise to rollback the hike.”
A rollback is a thing (“The rollback proposal failed in committee”); to roll back is to perform an action (“The state will roll back the price hike”). This sentence refers to an action, not a thing, so the compound must be changed to a verb phrase: “Resistance from the state legislature could doom the governor-elect’s promise to roll back the hike.”

4. “California gave a record $100 million loan to bailout schools.”
As in the previous example, what is in context an action is styled as a noun. The sentence should read, “California gave a record $100 million loan to bail out schools.” Better yet, close the sentence with the preposition: “California gave a record $100 million loan to bail schools out.”

5. “International organizations continue their pull out as rebels attack a train.”
If the sentence read that the organizations continued to pull out, the two-word verb phrase would be correct. But pulling out is an action, so it’s a pullout: “International organizations continue their pullout as rebels attack a train.”

Hope this has helped someone,
xoxo Siren.

Christmas novella!

I have 8 days to finish the current short story i am working on. I am totally head over heels addicted to the H/h in this story. Fingers crossed, i hope it will be accepted by Carina Press.
Carina Press is taking Holiday related stories at their website. Check them out, the deadline is March 1st 2013.

Happy Writing,
xoxo Siren

Motivation!!!

What motivates me to get up every morning and write? This is a question i was asked by a co-worker. She doesn’t understand why i focus on writing so much.

Well, I do it because i love it. It has been a passion of mine since i was a little girl. In high school i would write short stories about me and all my friends and the adventures we wished we could get into. I love having my neices and nephews over and telling the bed time stories that i wrote just from them.

Bottom line is, i love writing. I’m not perfect at it and i’m still learning the craft. But one day i plan to be a published author so i need to learn as much as i can about the craft and enter as many writer challenges as i can because it makes me a better writer.

What motivates you to write? Leave me a comment.
xoxo Siren.